Human life cannot be reduced to market transactions and human beings cannot only be treated as economic actors. When the power of the market increases, human beings will always try to protect themselves. Given the differences that exist in social and cultural traditions, these protective responses are likely to differ from one society to the other. This is why, even in a global market, diversity is always likely to persist. This book investigates the question of economic globalization - whether it is likely to lead to full convergence between political models and ways of life, or whether, even in a completely globalized world economy, there is likely to be scope for alternative solutions. But in a fully globalized world, how will we survive capitalism?

"Clearly and gracefully written, it presents an interesting and fertile thesis about the nature of capitalism and how different societies have learnt to cope with it."

John Gray, author of  Straw Dogs (Granta, 2002).

2017-01-21T02:57:14+00:00

John Gray, author of  Straw Dogs (Granta, 2002).

"Clearly and gracefully written, it presents an interesting and fertile thesis about the nature of capitalism and how different societies have learnt to cope with it."

"Surviving Capitalism presents a highly literate cost benefit analysis of the history of capitalism fresh, fascinating, relevant, and, yes, humane."

Jeff Madrick, editor, Challenge Magazine.

2017-01-21T03:03:13+00:00

Jeff Madrick, editor, Challenge Magazine.

"Surviving Capitalism presents a highly literate cost benefit analysis of the history of capitalism fresh, fascinating, relevant, and, yes, humane."

"Erik Ringmar has written a fascinating short book about the different forms of historical resistance to capitalism. ... Running through the somewhat schematic treatment is an endearing partiality to forms of sociability generously lubricated by alcohol. Ringmar uses striking images to put flesh on the bones."

Robert Skidelsky, author of John Maynard Keynes.

2017-01-21T03:05:06+00:00

Robert Skidelsky, author of John Maynard Keynes.

"Erik Ringmar has written a fascinating short book about the different forms of historical resistance to capitalism. ... Running through the somewhat schematic treatment is an endearing partiality to forms of sociability generously lubricated by alcohol. Ringmar uses striking images to put flesh on the bones."